Book Review #154 – Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman by Lindy West

Hey!

Let’s see what I thought about Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman, by Lindy West.

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Shrill

 

Synopsis:

Coming of age in a culture that demands women be as small, quiet, and compliant as possible–like a porcelain dove that will also have sex with you–writer and humorist Lindy West quickly discovered that she was anything but.

From a painfully shy childhood in which she tried, unsuccessfully, to hide her big body and even bigger opinions; to her public war with stand-up comedians over rape jokes; to her struggle to convince herself, and then the world, that fat people have value; to her accidental activism and never-ending battle royale with Internet trolls, Lindy narrates her life with a blend of humor and pathos that manages to make a trip to the abortion clinic funny and wring tears out of a story about diarrhea.

With inimitable good humor, vulnerability, and boundless charm, Lindy boldly shares how to survive in a world where not all stories are created equal and not all bodies are treated with equal respect, and how to weather hatred, loneliness, harassment, and loss–and walk away laughing. Shrillprovocatively dissects what it means to become self-aware the hard way, to go from wanting to be silent and invisible to earning a living defending the silenced in all caps.

 

Pros:

  • honest
  • great read about dealing with fatphobia
  • very touching

 

Cons:

  • just couldn’t really connect to it, for some reason

 

Verdict:

This is a beautiful book about self love. The author really dwelves on some tough subjects with much beauty. The essays about fatphobia and being a person with a different body size were really touching. And the one’s about her father’s death and the trolls were just heart breaking. I really liked her tone and her approach on things. This is definitely an important to read, for people who have dealt with this problems personally (because it will definitely help to learn how to love oneself better) or even if you haven’t (because it will give you some perspective and general way to not engage in this kind of bad behavior). But for some reason, I just couldn’t really connect with the book itself. I did with some of the things said, but overall, it felt kinda detached. Does that make any sense? I don’t know how to better explain it but it was just a feeling. Even though this is a good and important read, for some reason it didn’t made that big of an impression on me.

Have you read it? Please let me know!

Until soon,

Cat.

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